Style Guidelines - Beer

2016 CANADIAN BREWING AWARDS

-Styles Originating From Europe-

1. European Style Lager (Pilsner)

Straw/golden in colour and well-attenuated. Hop bitterness is low to medium. Hop flavour and aroma are medium-low to medium. Hop bouquet should be herbal/spicy Residual malt sweetness is low; does not predominate but may be perceived. Fruity esters and diacetyl should not be perceived. There should be no chill haze.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 11.0 – 13.7 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 2.0 – 3.2 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 4.4 – 5.25%
Bitterness (IBU): 17 – 30
Colour SRM: 3 – 4

2. European Style Amber to Dark Lager

European amber to dark lagers should be pale amber to dark brown/black. Aroma should be malt forward, exhibiting notes of toasted and/or slightly roasted malt, biscuit, bread, and mild chocolate aromas. Hop aroma should be low and flavour and aroma should be malt driven. Any hop flavours and aromas should be derived from noble hop types. Residual sweetness should be low to medium-low and the beer should finish crisply with a balance between malt sweetness and hop character.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 11.0 – 14.5 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 2.5 – 4.5 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 4.0 – 6.0%
Bitterness (IBU): 18 – 30
Colour (SRM): 5 – 30

3. Bock – Traditional German Style

Traditional bocks are made with all malt and are strong, malty, medium to full-bodied, bottom-fermented beers with moderate hop bitterness that should increase proportionately with the starting gravity. Hop flavour should be low and hop aroma should be very low. Bocks can range in colour from deep copper to dark brown. Fruity esters should be minimal.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 16.2 – 18.0 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 4.5 – 6.0 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 5.5 – 7.5%
Bitterness (IBU): 20 – 30
Colour SRM: 20 – 30

4. Kellerbier/Zwickelbier

Traditional Kellerbier examples are typically unaltered and often young, not fully lagered versions of Germanic lager styles of beer such as Münchner-Style Helles and Dunkel, Dortmunder/European-Style Export, Bohemianstyle Pilsener and German-style Pilsener. Kellerbier is noticeably less carbonated. Subtle or low levels of esters may be apparent. This is an unaltered beer but it may be naturally clear due to settling of yeast during aging. They may or may not be clear. Exhibiting a small amount of yeast haze in the appearance is acceptable. Low to moderately low levels of yeast-generated sulfur compounds in aroma and flavour should be apparent, and low levels of acetaldehyde or other volatiles normally scrubbed during fermentation may or may not be apparent. The sulfur and acetaldehyde characters should contribute positively to the beer drinking experience. Dry hopping is acceptable. Head retention may not be optimal.

Original Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Alcohol by Volume:: Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU): Varies with style
Colour SRM (EBC): Varies with style

5. German Style Kölsch

Kölsch is warm fermented and aged at cold temperatures. Kölsch is characterized by a golden to straw colour and a slightly dry, subtly sweet softness on the palate, yet crisp. Good, dense head retention is desirable. A light fruitiness may be apparent, but is not necessary for this style. Caramel character should not be evident. The body is light to medium-light. This beer has low hop flavour and aroma with medium bitterness. Wheat can be used in brewing this beer. Ale yeast is used for fermentation, though lager yeast is sometimes used in the bottle or final cold conditioning process. Fruity esters should be minimally perceived, if at all. Chill haze should be absent.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 10.5 – 12 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.5 – 2.5 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 4.8 – 5.3%
Bitterness (IBU): 18 – 25
Colour SRM: 4 – 6

6. Wheat Beer – Belgian Style (Wit)

Brewed using unmalted wheat and malted barley and spiced with coriander and orange peel. These very pale beers are often bottle-conditioned and served cloudy. The style is further characterized by the use of noble-type hops to achieve a low to medium bitterness and hop flavour. This beer has low to medium body, no diacetyl, and a low to medium fruity-ester level. Mild acidity is appropriate.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 11.0 – 12.5 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.5 – 2.5 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 4.8 – 6.0%
Bitterness (IBU): 15 – 25
Colour SRM: 2 – 4

7. Wheat Beer – German Style (Weiss)

The aroma and flavour of a weissbier with yeast is decidedly fruity and phenolic. The phenolic characteristics are often described as clove or nutmeg-like and can be smoky or even vanilla-like. Banana-like esters are often present. These beers are made with at least 50 percent malted wheat, and hop rates are quite low. Hop flavour and aroma are absent. Weissbier is well attenuated and very highly carbonated, yet its relatively high starting gravity and alcohol content make it a medium to full-bodied beer. The colour is very pale to pale amber. Because yeast is present, the beer will have yeast flavour and a characteristically fuller mouthfeel, and may be appropriately very cloudy. No diacetyl should be perceived.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 11.7 – 13.7 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 2.0 – 4.0 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 4.9 – 5.5%
Bitterness (IBU): 10 – 15
Colour SRM: 3 – 9

8. Baltic Porter

A true lager beer, black to very deep ruby/garnet in colour. Overall, Baltic Porters have a very smooth lagered character with distinctive character of roasted malts and dark sugars. Because of its alcoholic strength aroma includes gentle lager fruitiness (berries, grapes, plums; not banana), complex alcohols, cocoa-like, roast malt (and sometimes coffee-like roast barley). Hop aroma is very low, though a hint of hop aroma can complement aromatics and flavour without dominance. Baltic porters range from having medium to full body complemented with a medium-low to medium level of malty sweetness. Caramelized-type sugar flavours (light caramel to toffee-like, even licorice-like) can be integrated into the overall complexity of flavour profile. Hop bitterness is low to medium-low. Baltic Porters are not hop bitter dominated. Roasted dark malts may contribute some bitterness. A low degree of smokiness may be evident. Low to medium low estery fruitiness. No butterscotch-like diacetyl nor sweet corn-like DMS should be apparent in aroma or flavour.

Original Gravity (°Plato):16.0 – 20.5 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 4.0 – 5.5 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 5.2 – 7.2%
Bitterness (IBU): 22 – 35
Colour SRM: 25+

9. Belgian-Style Dubbel or Quadrupel

A. Subcategory: Belgian–Style Dubbel:

This medium-bodied, red to dark brown coloured ale has a malty sweetness and chocolate-like caramel aroma. A light hop avour and/or aroma is acceptable. Dubbels are also characterized by low-medium to medium bitterness. No diacetyl is acceptable. Yeast-generated fruity esters (especially banana) are appropriate at low levels. Head retention is dense and mousse-like. Chill haze is acceptable at low serving temperatures. Often bottle-conditioned a slight yeast haze and flavour may be evident.

*During registration brewers may specify pouring instructions, choosing normal pouring, quiet pouring, intentional rousing or not rousing yeast. Entries will be presented during judging as specified by entering brewer.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 14.7 –17.8 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 3.0 – 4.0 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 6.25 – 7.5%
Bitterness (IBU): 20 – 30
Colour SRM: 16 – 36
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B. Subcategory: Belgian–Style Quadrupel:

Quadrupels or “Quads” are characterized by the immense presence of alcohol and balanced avour, bitterness and aromas. Its colour is deep amber to rich chestnut/garnet brown. Often characterized by a mousse-like dense, sometimes amber head will top off a properly poured and served quad. Complex fruity aroma and flavour emerge reminiscent of raisins, dates, figs, grapes, plums often accompanied with a hint of winy character. Caramel, dark sugar and malty sweet flavours and aromas can be intense, not cloying, while complementing fruitiness. Though well attenuated it usually has a full, creamy body. Hop characters do not dominate; low to low-medium bitterness is perceived. Perception of alcohol can be extreme. Clove-like phenolic avour and aroma should not be evident. Chill haze is acceptable at low serving temperatures. Diacetyl and DMS should not be perceived. Well balanced with savouring/sipping drinkability. Oxidative character if evident in aged Quads should be mild and pleasant.

*During registration brewers may specify pouring instructions, choosing normal pouring, quiet pouring, intentional rousing or not rousing yeast. Entries will be presented during judging as specified by entering brewer.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 20.2 – 28 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 3.5 – 5.0 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 9 – 14%
Bitterness (IBU): 25 – 50
Colour SRM: 8 – 20

10. Belgian-Style Tripel

Tripels are often characterized by a complex, sometimes mild spicy character. Clove-like phenolic flavour and aroma may be evident at extremely low levels. Yeast-generated fruity esters including banana are also common, but not necessary. These pale/light-coloured ales may finish sweet, though any sweet finish should be light. The beer is characteristically medium and clean in body with an equalizing hop/malt balance and a perception of medium to medium high hop bitterness. Traditional Belgian Tripels are often well attenuated. Brewing sugar may be used to lighten the perception of body. Its sweetness will come from very pale malts. There should not be character from any roasted or dark malts. Low hop flavour is acceptable. Alcohol strength and flavour should be perceived as evident. Head retention is dense and mousse-like. Chill haze is acceptable at low serving temperatures. Traditional Tripels are bottle-conditioned, may exhibit slight yeast haze but the yeast should not be intentionally roused. Oxidative character if evident in aged Tripels should be mild and pleasant.

*During registration brewers may specify pouring instructions, choosing normal pouring, quiet pouring, intentional rousing or not rousing yeast. Entries will be presented during judging as specified by entering brewer.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 17 – 22 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 2.5 – 4.5 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 7.0 – 10.0%
Bitterness (IBU): 20 – 40
Colour SRM: 4 – 9

11. Belgian Style Abbey Ale/Pale Ale

Recognizing the uniqueness, variety and traditions of beers based on Belgian-style abbey ale, the beers entered in this subcategory do not t existing competition style guidelines for Dubbel, Tripel or Quad. Strong or weaker versions of traditional Abbey Ale styles, such as Quintuple or Single, would also be appropriately entered in this category. During registration brewers may specify pouring instructions, choosing normal pouring, quiet pouring, intentional rousing or not rousing yeast. Entries will be presented during judging as specified by entering brewer.

*To allow for accurate judging, the brewer must provide additional information about the entry. This information could include the historical or regional tradition of the style, or the brewer’s interpretation of the style. Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during judging.

Original Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Alcohol by Weight Volume: Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU): Varies with style
Colour SRM: Varies with style

12. Belgian-Style Strong Specialty Ale

A. Subcategory: Belgian–Style Pale Strong Ale

Belgian pale strong ales are pale to golden in colour with relatively light body for a beer of its alcoholic strength. Often brewed with light coloured Belgian “candy” sugar, these beers are well attenuated. The perception of hop bitterness is medium-low to medium -high, with hop flavour and aroma also in this range. These beers are highly attenuated and have a perceptively deceiving high alcoholic character—being light to medium bodied rather than full bodied. The intensity of malt character should be low to medium, often surviving along with a complex fruitiness. Very little or no diacetyl is perceived. Herbs and spices are sometimes used to delicately flavour these strong ales. Low levels of phenolic spiciness from yeast byproducts may also be perceived. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 16.0 – 22.9 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 3 – 6 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 7.0 – 11.0%
Bitterness (IBU): 20 – 50
Colour SRM: 3.5 – 10

B. Subcategory: Belgian-Style Dark Strong Ale
Belgian dark strong ales are amber to dark brown in colour. Often, though not always, brewed with dark Belgian “candy” sugar, these beers can be well attenuated, ranging from medium to full-bodied. The perception of hop bitterness is low to medium, with hop flavour and aroma also in this range. Fruity complexity along with the soft flavours of roasted malts add distinct character. The alcohol strength of these beers can often be deceiving to the senses. The intensity of malt character can be rich, creamy, and sweet with intensities ranging from medium to high. Very little or no diacetyl is perceived. Herbs and spices are sometimes used to delicately flavour these strong ales. Low levels of phenolic spiciness from yeast byproducts may also be perceived. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 16.0 – 22.9 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 3.0 – 6.0 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 7.0 – 11.0%
Bitterness (IBU): 20 – 50
Colour SRM: 7 – 35

C. Subcategory: Other Belgian-Style Strong Specialty Ale

Recognizing the uniqueness, variety and traditions of beers based on Belgian-style strong specialty ale, beers entered in this subcategory do not t other existing competition style guidelines for Belgian-Style Strong Specialty Ale shown above or other hybrid American and Belgian styles in this competition. Some barrel or wood-aged versions which do not primarily present as wood-aged entries, or other strong Belgian-style or Belgian inspired ales that defy categorization, would be appropriately entered in this category.

*To allow for accurate judging, the brewer must provide additional information about the entry. This information could include the historical or regional tradition of the style, or the brewer’s interpretation of the style. Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during judging.

13. French and Belgian Style Saison

Beers in this category are golden to deep amber in colour. There may be quite a variety of characters within this style. Generally: They are light to medium in body. Malt aroma is low to medium-low. Fruity esters dominate the aroma, while hop character, complex alcohols, herbs, spices, low Brettanomyces character and even clove and smoke-like phenolics may or may not be evident in the overall balanced beer. Malt flavour is low but provides foundation for the overall balance. Hop bitterness is moderate to moderately assertive. Herb and/or spice flavours, including black pepper-like notes, may or may not be evident. Fruitiness from fermentation is generally in character. A balanced small amount of sour or acidic flavours is acceptable when in balance with other components. Earthy, cellar-like, musty aromas are okay. Diacetyl should not be perceived. Chill or slight yeast haze is okay. Often bottle conditioned with some yeast character and high carbonation. Brewer may indicate on the bottle whether the yeast should be intentionally roused or if they prefer that the entry is poured as quietly as possible.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 14.0 – 19.5 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.0 – 4.0 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 4.5 – 8.5%
Bitterness (IBU): 20 – 40
Colour SRM: 4 – 14

14. Belgian-Style Brett Beer

Belgian-style beers that have used any strain of brett in a secondary fermentation to enhance/change the flavour of the base beer. Beers that have utilized Brett are most often drier and more fruity than the base beer style suggests. Funky notes, including horsey, goaty, leathery, and phenolic, range from low to high depending on the age of the beer and the strain of Brett used. May contain a light acidity, although this is not derived from Brett and should not dominate other components. Younger Brett-fermented beers will possess more fruity notes including stone fruits, tropical fruits, and citrus, although the origins these aromas can be difficult to determine in highly-hopped Brett beers. Older Brett beers may begin to develop funk notes of barnyard, wet hay, and earth, but these characteristics should not dominate. Beer should not be unpleasantly funky, such as band-aid, nail polish remover, cheese, etc. Brett beers may be lightly tart, but should not be truly sour.

*To allow for accurate judging the brewer must provide information listing a classic or other Belgian-style of base beer being elaborated upon, fruit or other special ingredients if present, and/or special processes used.

Original Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Alcohol by Volume: Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU): Varies with style
Colour (SRM): Varies with style

15. German-Style Sour Ale

A) Berliner-Style Weisse
Berliner Weisses are straw to pale in colour. No diacetyl or hop aroma should be perceived. Malt sweetness is absent as well as hop flavour. The combination of yeast and lactic acid bacteria fermentation results in a beer that is highly acidic and highly attenuated. Fruity-ester flavours may be evident at low to medium levels. No brettanomyces character should be perceived. (Beers with a noticeable brettanomyces character should be entered in the Brett Beer category). Berliner Weisses may be served with sweet fruit or herbal syrups as is part of the traditional serving method. Body is low and carbonation is high.

*For the purposes of judging, please indicate whether fruit or other flavours have been added and include a description of additional ingredients.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 7.0 – 8.0 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) : 1.0 – 1.5 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 2.8 – 3.5%
Bitterness (IBU): 3 – 6
Colour (SRM): 2 – 4

B) Gose
Goses are straw to medium amber in colour. Appearance may be cloudy/hazy with yeast character. Aromas often include lemon and other citrus-like characters. Some examples may have a spicy aroma due to the addition of coriander at low to medium levels. Brettanomyces character should be very low to non-existent. Hop aroma is not perceived, and malt sweetness is not perceived to very low. Flavours may include lemon, citrus, spice, and salt (which is traditionally added). Accurate examples of the style should exhibit a complex acidity. Sourness should be presented as sharp and refreshing.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 9.0 – 13.7 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 2.0 – 3.0 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 4.4 – 5.4%
Bitterness (IBU): 10 – 15
Colour (SRM): 3 – 9

16. Belgian-Style Sour Ale

A) Flanders Red Ale
Deep red to reddish brown in colour. A sour, fruity, red-wine-like Belgian-style with an interesting supportive malt structure and fruit complexity. Should have a dry finish and noticeable tannins. Aroma should be complex-fruity sour with supporting malt that often gives a wine-like impression. Fruit notes in both aroma and flavour may include black cherries, oranges, plums, or red currants. Low to medium vanilla and/or chocolate notes are also often present. Sour flavour ranges from complementary to intense, and can have an acidic bite, however overwhelming acetic notes are inappropriate. Balanced to the malt side with a soft, toasty quality, but dominated by the fruity, sour, wine-like impression.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 12.0 – 14.0 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 0.5 – 3.0 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 4.6 – 6.5%
Bitterness (IBU): 10 – 25
Colour (SRM): 10 – 16

B) Oud Bruin

Dark reddish brown to brown in colour. A malty, fruity, aged, somewhat sour Belgian-style brown ale. Aroma and flavour should be a complex combination of fruity esters and rich malt character. Ester notes commonly include raisins, plums, figs, dates, black cherries, and prunes. Medium low to medium high malt character of caramel, toffee, orange, treacle, or chocolate. Spicy phenols can be present in low amounts for complexity. Aged examples may present a sherry-like character. Sourness should be noticeable without becoming unpleasantly vinegary. Overall impression should be of a sweet and sour balance.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 10.0 – 18.0 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 2.0 – 3.0 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 4.0 – 8.0%
Bitterness (IBU): 20 – 25
Colour (SRM): 15-22

C) Lambic / Gueuze
Pale yellow to deep golden in colour. A fairly sour, often moderately funky Belgian wheat beer with sourness taking the place of hop bitterness in the balance. Aroma may vary from decidedly sour to more subdued as the beer ages. Other aromas may include horse blanket, barnyard, earth, hay, etc. A mild citrus-fruity aroma is considered favourable, while smoky, cigar-like, or cheesy aromas are unfavourable. Sour flavours can vary from a sharp lactic character, to more of a balance between sourness, malt, wheat, and barnyard characteristics. Some examples may exhibit flavours of apple, rhubarb, honey, or other citrus such as grapefruit. Should have a medium to high puckering quality without being sharply astringent. No hop flavour.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 10.0 – 13.2 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 0.1 – 2.5 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 5.0 – 6.5%
Bitterness (IBU): 0 – 10
Colour (SRM): 3 – 7

D) Fruit Lambic

Colour may vary depending on the fruit added, although lighter-coloured fruits may have little effect on colour. A complex, fruity, pleasantly sour, wild wheat ale fermented by a variety of Belgian yeast and bacteria. The type of fruit used may become difficult to identify as the flavours may transform over time. The specified fruit should be a dominant aroma, and a low to moderately sour character should be present. Funk notes may be present in the aroma, and should blend well with the fruit notes. The specified fruit should be evident in the flavour, and should blend well with a low to moderate sour flavour. The finish is commonly dry and tart, but a low, complementary sweetness may be present. No hop flavour. Should have a low to high tart, puckering quality without being sharply astringent.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 10.0 – 14.7 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity: 0.1 – 2.5 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 5.0 – 7.0%
Bitterness (IBU): 0 – 10
Colour (SRM): 3 – 7 (varies with fruit)

-Styles Originating From the U.K-

17. Porter

Ruby or deep garnet in colour with a roast malt flavour but no roast barley flavour . A sharp bitterness of black malt without a highly burnt/charcoal flavour . Robust porters range from medium to full in body and have a malty sweetness. Hop bitterness is medium to high, with hop aroma and flavour ranging from negligible to medium. Fruity esters should be evident, balanced with roast malt and hop bitterness.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 10.7 – 14.7 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 2.0 – 4.0 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 5.0 – 6.5%
Bitterness (IBU): 25 – 40
Colour SRM: 30+

18. Brown Ale

Range from deep copper to brown in colour. They have a medium body and a dry to sweet maltiness with very little hop flavour or aroma. Roast malt tones may sometimes contribute to the flavour and aroma profile. Fruity-ester flavours are appropriate. Diacetyl should be very low, if evident. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 10.0 – 12.5 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 2.0 – 3.5 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 4.0 – 5.5%
Bitterness (IBU): 15 – 25
Colour SRM: 15-22

19. Scotch Ale

Scotch ales are overwhelmingly malty and full-bodied. Perception of hop bitterness is very low. Hop flavour and aroma are very low or nonexistent. Colour ranges from deep copper to brown. The clean alcohol flavour balances the rich and dominant sweet maltiness in flavour and aroma. A caramel character is often a part of the profile. Dark roasted malt flavours and aroma may be evident at low levels. If present, fruity esters are generally at low aromatic and flavour levels. Low diacetyl levels are acceptable. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures. Because there is little evidence suggesting that traditionally made strong Scotch ales exhibited peat smoke character, entries in this subcategory will not exhibit peaty/ smoky character.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 18.0 – 20.4 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 4.0 – 7.0 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 6.2 – 8.0%
Bitterness (IBU): 25 – 35
Colour SRM:15 – 30

20. English Style Pale Ale

Golden to copper coloured. Medium to high hop bitterness, flavour, and aroma should be evident. Medium-bodied pale ales have low to medium malt flavour and aroma. Low caramel character is allowable. Fruity-ester flavours and aromas are moderate to strong. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures. The absence of diacetyl is desirable, though, diacetyl (butterscotch character) is acceptable and characteristic when at very low levels.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 11.0 – 13.7 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 2.0 – 4.0 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 4.5 – 5.5%
Bitterness (IBU): 20 – 40
Colour SRM: 5 – 14

21. English Bitters

A) Ordinary or Special Bitter

Drinkability is a critical component of the style. Low to moderate malt aroma, often (but not always) with a light caramel quality. Bready, biscuity, or lightly toasty malt complexity is common. Mild to moderate fruitiness. Hop aroma and flavour can range from moderate to low, typically with a floral, earthy, resiny, and/or fruity character. Generally no diacetyl, although very low levels are allowed. Pale amber to light copper colour. Good to brilliant clarity. Medium to moderately high bitterness. Balance is often decidedly bitter, although the bitterness should not completely overpower the malt flavour, esters and hop flavour.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 7.5 – 11.2 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.5 – 3.0 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 3.2 – 4.8%
Bitterness (IBU): 20 – 40
Colour (SRM): 5 – 14

B) Best Bitter or ESB

A typical example of the style exhibits a fairly even balance between malt and hops. Moderate emphasis on bitterness is acceptable. Drinkability is a critical component of the style. Hop aroma is moderately-high to moderately low, typically with a floral, earthy, resinous, and/or fruity character. Medium to medium-high malt aroma, often with a low to moderate caramel aspect. Low levels of diacetyl are accepted. Medium-low to medium-high fruity esters are desirable. Colour can be light amber to deep copper, with good clarity. Flavour should demonstrate medium to medium-high bitterness, with supporting malt flavours. Malt profile is typically bready, biscuity, nutty, or lightly toasty, with an optional caramel or toffee flavour (in moderate amounts).

Original Gravity (°Plato): 10.0 – 14.7 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 2.0 – 4.0 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 4.0 – 6.2%
Bitterness (IBU): 25 – 50
Colour (SRM): 8 – 18

22. Sweet Stout or Cream Stout

Very dark brown to black in colour, sweet/cream stouts should exhibit malt sweetness, chocolate, and caramel aromas. Some roast character may be present. Fruity esters are low if present. Hop aroma is not perceived. Flavour profile should be dominated by malt and cream sweetness, chocolate, coffee, and caramel, as well as mild roastiness. Bitterness derived from roasted malt should be low to medium-low. Hop bitterness should serve to balance the sweetness without contributing apparent flavour or aroma. Body should be full, silky, and create an overall sweet impression.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 11.2 – 16.0 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 2.5 – 4.5 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 4.2 – 6.0%
Bitterness (IBU): 25 – 40
Colour (SRM): 30 – 40+

23. Oatmeal Stout

Dark brown to black in colour. Roasted malt and coffee-like roasted barley aromas are prominent. A light nutty/grainy oatmeal aroma is acceptable. Chocolate and caramel aromas and flavours derived from malt should be evident. Fruity-esters are not perceived to very low. Hop aroma is acceptable, but should not overwhelm the overall balance. Chocolate and coffee tones should be evident, while remaining smooth and not bitter. Hop bitterness is medium. The addition of oatmeal in the grist should result in a pleasant, full flavour, without contributing a grainy character. Body is full.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 10.0 – 15.2 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 2.0 – 4.0 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 4.0 – 6.1%
Bitterness (IBU): 20 – 40
Colour (SRM): 20+

24. Dry Stout

Dry stouts are black in colour. Significant head retention should be part of the visual character. The aromas should be largely defined by coffee-like roasted barley, dark chocolate, and moderate roasted malt character. Hop aroma is at low levels, and of European type if present. Initial flavour profile may include light caramel, bittersweet chocolate, and coffee. Dry stouts exhibit a dry-roasted character which should produce a distinct bitterness in the finish. Slight acidity and astringency may be perceived but is not necessary. Dry stouts are sometimes served nitrogenated, which produces an enhanced creaminess.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 9.0 – 11.0 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 2.2 – 2.7 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 4.0 – 5.0%
Bitterness (IBU): 25 – 45
Colour (SRM): 25 – 40+

25. Imperial Stout

Dark copper to very black, imperial stouts typically have a high alcohol content. The extremely rich malty flavour and aroma are balanced with assertive hopping and fruity-ester characteristics. Bitterness can be moderate and balanced with the malt character or very high in the darker versions. Roasted malt astringency and bitterness can be moderately perceived but should not overwhelm the overall character. Hop aroma can be subtle to overwhelmingly hop- oral, citrus or herbal. Diacetyl (butterscotch) levels should be very low. This style may be subcategorized into black and quite robust “American” versions and dark copper coloured and caramel accented “European” versions.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 19 – 26°Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 4.5 – 7.5 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 5.5-9.5%
Bitterness (IBU): 50-80
Colour SRM: 20+

26. English Style India Pale Ale

Most traditional interpretations of English-style India pale ales are characterized by medium-high hop bitterness with a medium to medium-high alcohol content. Hops from a variety of origins may be used to contribute to a high hopping rate. Earthy and herbal English-variety hop character is the perceived end, but may be a result of the skillful use of hops of other national origins. The use of water with high mineral content results in a crisp, dry beer, sometimes with subtle and balanced character of sulfur compounds. This pale gold to deep copper-coloured ale has a medium to high, flowery hop aroma and may have a medium to strong hop flavour (in addition to the hop bitterness). English-style India pale ales possess medium maltiness and body. Fruity-ester flavours and aromas are moderate to very strong. Diacetyl can be absent or may be perceived at very low levels. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures. Hops of other origins may be used for bitterness or approximating traditional English character.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 12.5 – 15.7 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 3.0 – 4.5 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 5.0 – 7.0%
Bitterness (IBU): 35 – 63
Colour SRM: 6 – 14

-Styles Originating from North America-

27. North American Style Lager

Light in body and colour, clean and crisp and well carbonated. Flavour components should be subtle and complex, with no one ingredient dominating the others. Malt sweetness is light to mild. Corn, rice, or other grain or sugar adjuncts are often used. Hop bitterness, flavour and aroma are negligible to very light. Light fruity esters are acceptable. Chill haze and diacetyl should be absent.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 10.5 – 12.5 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) : 1.5 – 2.5 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 3.5 – 5.1%
Bitterness (IBU): 5 – 14
Colour SRM: 2 – 4

28. North American Style Premium Lager

Pale straw to gold colour. White, frothy head may not be long lasting. Very clear. Flavour is Crisp and dry with some low levels of grainy or malty sweetness. Low to medium-low malt aroma, which can be grainy, sweet or corn-like. Hop flavour ranges from none to low levels. Hop bitterness at low to medium level. Balance may vary from slightly malty to slightly bitter, but is relatively close to even. High levels of carbonation may provide a slight acidity or dry “sting.” No diacetyl. No fruitiness.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 11.5 – 13.5 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 2.0 – 3.0 °Plato
Alcohol By Volume: 4.6 – 6%
Bitterness (IBU): 15 – 25
Colour SRM: 2 – 6

29. North American Style Amber Lager

Reddish brown, or copper coloured and medium bodied. A noticeable degree of caramel-type malt character in flavour and often in aroma. This is a broad category in which the hop bitterness, flavour, and aroma may be accentuated or may only be present at relatively low levels, yet noticeable. Hop aroma and flavour should be of the New World variety (citrus, floral, pine, resinous, spicy, tropical fruit, stone fruit, berry, or melon) Fruity esters, diacetyl, and chill haze should be absent.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 10.5 – 14.2 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 2.5 – 4.5 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 4.8 – 5.4%
Bitterness (IBU): 18 – 30
Colour SRM: 6 – 14

30. North American Style Dark Lager

Malt aroma and flavour are low but notable. Colour ranges from very deep copper to deep, dark brown. Body is light. Non-malt adjuncts are often used, and hop rates are low. Hop bitterness, flavour, and aroma are low. Carbonation is high. Fruity esters, diacetyl, and chill haze should not be perceived.

Original Gravity: 10.0 – 12.5 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 2.0 – 3.0 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 4.0 – 5.5%
Bitterness (IBU): 14 – 20
Colour SRM: 14 – 25

31. Light (Calorie-Reduced) Lager

These beers are extremely light coloured, light in body, and high in carbonation. Corn, rice, or other grain or sugar adjuncts are often used. Flavour is mild and hop bitterness aroma is negligible to very low. Light fruity esters are acceptable. Chill haze and diacetyl should be absent.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 6.0 -10.0 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 0.5 – 2.0 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 3.4 – 4.4%
Bitterness (IBU): 5 – 10
Colour SRM: 1.5 – 4

32. Cream Ale

A mild, pale, light-bodied ale, made using a warm fermentation (top or bottom) and cold lagering or by blending top and bottom-fermented beers. Hop bitterness and flavour range from very low to low. Hop aroma is often absent. A low level of corn-like aroma and flavour is common, but not required. These beers are crisp and refreshing. A fruity or estery aroma may be perceived. Diacetyl and chill haze should not be perceived.

*N.B. “Maple” Cream Ales should be entered in the Special Honey/Maple Lager or Ale category.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 11.0 – 13.2 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.0 – 2.5 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 4.2 – 5.6%
Bitterness (IBU): 10 – 22
Colour SRM: 2 – 5

33. North American Style Amber/Red Ale

Range from light copper to light brown in colour. Characterized by North American-variety hops used to produce high hop bitterness, flavour, and medium to high aroma. Medium-high to high maltiness with medium to low caramel character. Should have medium to medium-high body. May have low levels of fruity-ester flavour and aroma. Hop aroma and flavour should be of the New World variety (citrus, floral, pine, resinous, spicy, tropical fruit, stone fruit, berry, or melon). Diacetyl can be either absent or barely perceived at very low levels. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures. Slight yeast haze is acceptable for bottle-conditioned products.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 12.0 – 14.2 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 3.0 – 2.5 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 4.5 – 6%
Bitterness (IBU): 30 – 40
Colour SRM: 11-18

34. North American Style Blonde or Golden Ale

Golden or Blonde ales are straw to golden blonde in colour. They have a crisp, dry palate, low hop flavour and aroma, light to medium body, and light malt sweetness. Bitterness is low to medium. Fruity esters may be perceived but do not predominate. Diacetyl should not be perceived. Chill haze should be absent.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 11.0 – 14.5 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 2.0 – 4.0 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 4.0 – 5.0%
Bitterness (IBU): 15 – 25
Colour SRM: 3 – 7

35. American–Style Black Ale

American-style Black Ale is perceived to have medium high to high hop bitterness, flavour and aroma with medium-high alcohol content, balanced with a medium body. Fruity, floral and herbal character from hops of all origins may contribute character. The style is further characterized by a moderate degree of caramel malt character and dark roasted malt flavour and aroma. High astringency and high degree of burnt roast malt character should be absent.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 14.0 – 18.2 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 3.0 – 4.5 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 6.0 – 7.5%
Bitterness (IBU): 50 – 70
Colour SRM: 35+

36. North American Style Pale Ale

American pale ales range from deep golden to copper in colour. The style is characterized by fruity, oral and citrus-like American-variety hop character producing high hop bitterness, flavour, and aroma. Note that “floral and citrus-like American variety hop character” is the perceived end, but may be a result of the skillful use of hops of other national origins. American pale ales have medium body and low to medium maltiness. Low caramel character is allowable. Fruity-ester flavours and aroma should be moderate to strong. Diacetyl should be absent or present at very low levels. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 11.0 – 12.5 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 2 – 3.5 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 4.5 – 5.5%
Bitterness (IBU): 28 – 40
Colour SRM: 6 – 14

37. Wheat Beer – North American Style

This beer can be made using either ale or lager yeast. It can be brewed with 30 to 75 percent wheat, and hop rates may be low to medium. A fruity-estery aroma and flavour are typical but at low levels; however, phenolic, clove-like characteristics should not be perceived. Colour is usually straw to light amber, and the body should be light to medium in character. Diacetyl should not be perceived. Because this style is packaged and served without yeast, no yeast characters should be evident in mouthfeel, flavour, or aroma.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 9.0 – 12.5 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.0 – 4.5 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 3.8 – 5.0%
Bitterness (IBU): 10 – 35
Colour SRM: 2-10

38. American Style India Pale Ale

American-style India pale ales have intense hop bitterness, flavour and aroma with medium-high alcohol content. The style is further characterized by fruity, oral and citrus-like American-variety hop character. Note that fruity, floral and citrus-like American-variety hop character is the perceived end, but may be a result of the skillful use of hops of other national origins. The use of water with high mineral content results in a crisp, dry beer. This pale gold to deep copper-coloured ale has a full, flowery hop aroma and may have a strong hop flavour (in addition to the hop bitterness). India pale ales possess medium maltiness which contributes to a medium body. Fruity-esters, flavours and aromas are moderate to very strong. Diacetyl can be absent or may be perceived at very low levels. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 14.7 – 18.2 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 3.0 – 4.5 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 6.3 – 7.5%
Bitterness (IBU): 50 – 70
Colour SRM: 6 – 14

39. Session India Pale Ale

Colour is light gold to copper. Hop haze is acceptable at any temperature. Fruity-ester aroma and flavour are light to moderate. Aroma should be distinctly driven by hop character. Aromas may be from a wide variety of hops from around the world. Low to medium-low maltiness is present. Hop flavour is strong, and may include a variety of differing hop flavours. Hop bitterness is medium to medium-high. Diacetyl is absent or at very low levels. Body is low to medium and drinkability should be the focus.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 9.5 – 12.7 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 2.0 – 3.5 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 3.7 – 5.0%
Bitterness (IBU): 40 – 55
Colour (SRM): 4 – 12

40. American Style Imperial India Pale Ale

Imperial or Double India Pale Ales have intense hop bitterness, flavour and aroma. Alcohol content is medium-high to high and notably evident. They range from deep golden to medium copper in colour. The style may use any variety of hops. Though the hop character is intense it’s balanced with complex alcohol flavours, moderate to high fruity esters and medium to high malt character. Hop character should be fresh and lively and should not be harsh in quality. The use of large amounts of hops may cause a degree of appropriate hop haze. Imperial or Double India Pale Ales have medium-high to full body. Diacetyl should not be perceived. The intention of this style of beer is to exhibit the fresh and bright character of hops. Oxidative character and aged character should not be present.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 18.2 – 23.7 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 4.0 – 5.6 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 7.5 – 10.5%
Bitterness (IBU): 65 – 100
Colour SRM: 5 – 13

41. American Belgo-Style Ale

Fruity-ester aroma and flavour are medium to high. Hop flavour and aroma are medium to very high, exhibiting American type hop aromas not usually found in traditional Belgian styles. Hop bitterness is medium to very high. Fruity-ester flavours should be medium to high. Yeast derived characters such as banana, berry, apple, sometimes coriander spice-like and/or smoky-phenolic characters should be portrayed with balance of hops and malt character when fermented with Belgian yeasts. Brettanomyces character should be absent. American-Belgo-Style Ales are either:
1) non- Belgian beer types portraying the unique characters imparted by yeasts typically used in big fruity Belgian-style ales,
or
2) defined Belgian-style beers portraying a unique character of American hops. These beers are unique beers unto themselves.

*To allow for accurate judging the brewer must provide information that identifies the classic beer style being elaborated upon (if there is one) or other information unique to the entry such as hop variety(ies) used, yeast type, etc.

Original Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Alcohol by Volume: Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU): 30 – 80
Color (SRM): Varies with style

42. American-style Brett Beer

An American-style Brett Beers can be very light to black in appearance, and may take on colour of added fruits or other ingredients. Chill haze, bacteria and yeast-induced haze are allowable at low to medium levels at any temperature. Moderate to intense yet balanced fruity-ester aromas are evident. In darker versions, roasted malt, caramel-like and chocolate-like aromas are subtly present. Diacetyl and DMS aromas should not be perceived. Hop aroma is evident over a full range from low to high. In darker versions, roasted malt, caramel-like and chocolate-like flavours are subtly present. Fruited versions will exhibit fruit flavours in harmonious balance with other characters. Hop flavour is evident over a full range from low to high. Hop bitterness is evident over a full range from low to high. The evolution of natural acidity develops balanced complexity. Horsey, goaty, leathery, phenolic and light to moderate and/or fruity acidic character evolved from Brettanomyces organisms may be evident, not dominant and in balance with other character. Acidity may also be contributed to by bacteria, but may or may not dominate. Moderate to intense yet balanced fruity-ester flavours are evident. Residual flavours that come from liquids previously aged in a barrel such as bourbon or sherry should not be present. Wood vessels may be used during the fermentation and aging process, but wood-derived flavours such as vanillin must not be present. Diacetyl and DMS flavours should not be perceived. Body is evident over a full range from low to high.

*To allow for accurate judging the brewer must provide information listing a classic or other style of base beer being elaborated upon, and any other ingredients or processes used. Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during judging.

Original Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Alcohol by Volume: Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU): Varies with style
Colour SRM: Varies with style

43. American-style Sour Ale

An American-style Sour Ales can be very light to black in appearance, and may take on colour of other ingredients. Chill haze, bacteria and yeast-induced haze are allowable at low to medium levels at any temperature. Moderate to intense yet balanced fruity-ester aromas are evident. In darker versions, roasted malt, caramel-like and chocolate-like aromas are subtly present. Diacetyl and DMS aromas should not be perceived. Hop aroma is evident over a full range from low to high. In darker versions, roasted malt, caramel-like and chocolate-like flavours are subtly present. Hop bitterness is evident over a full range from low to high. There is no Brettanomyces character in this style of beer. The evolution of natural acidity develops balanced complexity. The acidity present is usually in the form of lactic, acetic and other organic acids naturally developed with acidified malt in the mash or in fermentation by the use of various microorganisms including certain bacteria and yeasts. Acidic character can be a complex balance of several types of acid and characteristics of age. Moderate to intense yet balanced fruity-ester flavours are evident. Diacetyl and DMS flavours should not be perceived. Body is evident over a full range from low to high.

**For Wood or Barrel-aged Sour Beer see Category 52.

*To allow for accurate judging the brewer must provide information listing a classic or other style of base beer being elaborated upon, and any other ingredients or processes used. Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during judging.

Original Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Alcohol by Volume: Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU): Varies with style
Colour SRM: Varies with style

-Mixed Beer Styles-

44. Special Honey/Maple Lager or Ale

These beers are brewed using honey or maple in addition to malted barley. Beers may be brewed to a traditional style or may be experimental. Character of honey or maple should be evident in flavour and aroma and balanced with the other components without overpowering them.

*The brewer should list the traditional or experimental style of the base beer, to allow for accurate judging. Beer entries not accompanied by this information may be at a disadvantage during judging.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 7.5 – 25.5 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 2.5 – 7.5 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 2.5 – 12%
Bitterness (IBU): 0 – 100
Colour SRM: 20+

45. Fruit Beer or Field Beer

A. Subcategory: Fruit Beer

Fruit beers are any beers using fruit or fruit extracts as an adjunct in any of the mash, kettle, primary or secondary fermentation, providing obvious (ranging from subtle to intense), yet harmonious, fruit qualities. Fruit qualities should not be overpowered by hop character. Beers containing a fruit (such as juniper berry) with herbal or spice qualities would be more appropriately entered in the herb and spice beer category. Beers containing pumpkin would be more appropriately entered in the pumpkin beer subcategory below. Acidic bacterial (not wild yeast) fermentation characters may be evident (but not necessary); they would contribute to acidity and enhance fruity balance. Clear or hazy beer is acceptable in appearance.

*To allow for accurate judging the brewer must list what fruits are used, may indicate whether the base wheat beer is to be served with or without yeast, and may list any other ingredients or processes used (for example, bacterial or Brettanomyces fermentation). Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during judging.

Original Gravity (°Plato) 7.5 – 26 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) 1.5 – 7.5 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 2.5 – 12%
Bitterness (IBU): 5 – 70
Colour SRM: 5 – 50

B. Subcategory: Fruit Wheat Beer

Fruit wheat beers are any classic light wheat beers using fruit or fruit extracts as an adjunct in any of the mash, kettle, primary or secondary fermentation, providing obvious (ranging from subtle to intense), yet harmonious, fruit qualities. Fruit qualities should not be overpowered by hop character. Beers containing a fruit (such as juniper berry) with herbal or spice qualities would be more appropriately entered in the herb and spice beer category. Beers containing pumpkin would be more appropriately entered in the pumpkin beer subcategory below. Acidic bacterial (not wild yeast) fermentation characters may be evident (but not necessary); they would contribute to acidity and enhance fruity balance. Clear or hazy beer is acceptable in appearance.

*To allow for accurate judging the brewer must list what fruits are used, may indicate whether the base wheat beer is to be served with or without yeast, and may list any other ingredients or processes used (for example, bacterial or Brettanomyces fermentation). Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during judging.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 9.0 – 14.0 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.0 – 4.5 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 3.8 – 5.0%
Bitterness (IBU): 10 – 35
Colour SRM: 2 – 10

C. Subcategory: Field Beer

Field beers are any beers using vegetables as an adjunct in any of the mash, kettle, primary or secondary fermentation, providing obvious (ranging from subtle to intense), yet harmonious, qualities. Vegetable qualities should not be overpowered by hop character. Beers containing a vegetable (such as chili peppers) with herbal or spice qualities would be more appropriately entered in the herb and spice beer category. Beers containing pumpkin would be more appropriately entered in the pumpkin beer subcategory below. Clear or hazy beer is acceptable in appearance.

*To allow for accurate judging the brewer must list what vegetables are used, and may also list a classic style of base beer, or any other ingredients or processes used. Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during judging.

Original Gravity (°Plato) 7.5 – 26 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) 1.5 – 7.5 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 2.5 – 13.1%
Bitterness (IBU): 5 – 70
Colour SRM: 5 – 50

D. Subcategory: Pumpkin Beer

Pumpkin beers are any beers using pumpkins (Cucurbito pepo) as an adjunct in either mash, kettle, primary or secondary fermentation, providing obvious (ranging from subtle to intense), yet harmonious, qualities. Pumpkin qualities should not be overpowered by hop character. Entries in this subcategory may or may not be spiced or flavoured with other ingredients.

*To allow for accurate judging the brewer must provide information about their entry that lists a classic style of base beer, and/or any other ingredients or processes used. Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during judging.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 7.5 – 26 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.5 – 7.5 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 2.5 – 12.0%
Bitterness (IBU): 5 – 70
Colour SRM: 5 – 50

46. Gluten Free Beer

A beer (lager, ale or other) that is made from fermentable sugars, grains and converted carbohydrates. Ingredients do not contain gluten (Zero gluten: no barley, wheat, spelt, oats, rye, etc). May or may not contain malted grains that do not contain gluten. Brewers typically design and identify these beers along other style guidelines with regard to flavour, aroma and appearance profile.

*To allow for accurate judging the brewer must identify the ingredients and fermentation type used to make the beer, and/ or the classic beer style being elaborated upon (if there is one) with regard to flavour , aroma and appearance.

Original Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Alcohol by Volume: Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU): Varies with style
Colour SRM: Varies with style

47. Session Ale

A Session Beer is any beer made to a lower strength of a classic style. Appearance and aroma will vary by style. Any style of beer can be made lower in strength than described in the above guidelines. The goal should be to reach a balance between the style’s character and the lower alcohol content. Drinkability is a character in the overall balance of these beers. Beers in this category must not exceed 5.1% alcohol by volume.

*For purposes of competition, entries containing less than 5.1% abv which could be appropriately entered in any other classic or traditional category should be entered in that category and not entered as a session beer. To allow for accurate judging the brewer must identify the base style by name or category number that is being created lower in alcohol and/or appropriately identify the style created.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 8.5 – 10.0 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.0 – 2.6 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 4.1% – 5.1%
Bitterness (IBU): 10 – 30
Color SRM: 2+

48. Experimental Beer

An experimental beer is any beer (lager, ale or other) that is primarily grain-based and employs unusual techniques and/or ingredients. All entries in this subcategory must derive a minimum 51% of the fermentable carbohydrates from malted grains. Judges will consider the overall uniqueness of the process, ingredients used and creativity when evaluating beers entered in this category. Beers not easily matched to existing categories in a competition would often be entered into this category. Beers that are a combination of two or more hybrid and/or traditional categories (spice, fruit, smoke, wood-aged, specialty, porter, etc.) may also be entered into this category.

*Unless remarkably experimental, most wood and barrel-aged beers would probably be more appropriately entered in one of the wood and barrel-aged categories.

**To allow for accurate judging the brewer should identify the experimental style/process or ingredients used to make the beer unique, and also the classic beer style being elaborated upon (if appropriate). Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during judging.

49. Herb and Spice Beer

Herb and Spice beers are any beers using herbs or spices (derived from roots, seeds, fruits, vegetable, flowers, etc.) other than or in addition to hops to create a distinct (ranging from subtle to intense) individual aroma and/or flavour. Characters of herbs and/or spices used may not always be identifiable but should be evident. Hop aroma and flavour is not essential but may be evident in certain herbed/spiced beer styles and may or may not dominate over herb-spice character. Malt sweetness will vary dramatically depending on overall balance desired. Hop bitterness is very low to low. Positive evaluations are significantly based on perceived balance of flavours. Herb and Spice Beers are any range of colour depending on the underlying beer style. Clear or hazy beer is acceptable in appearance.

*To allow for accurate judging the brewer must list what herbs and/or spices are used.

Original Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Alcohol by Volume: Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU): 5 – 40
Colour (SRM): 5 – 50

50. Smoked Beer

A smoke-enhanced beer showing good balance between the smoke and beer character, while remaining pleasant to drink. Balance in the use of smoke, hops and malt character is exhibited by the better examples. Smoke aroma and flavour may vary from low to assertive; however, balance in the overall presentation is the key to well-made examples. The quality and secondary characteristics of the smoke are reflective of the source of the smoke (e.g., alder, oak, beechwood). Sharp, phenolic, harsh, rubbery, or burnt smoke-derived aromatics are inappropriate. Smoke can add some dryness to the finish.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 12.5 – 14.0 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 3.0 – 4.0 °Plato
Alcohol by (Volume): 4.8 – 6%
Bitterness (IBU): 20 – 30
Colour (SRM): 12 – 30

51. Barley Wine-Style Ale

A. Subcategory: English-Style Barley Wine Ale

English-style barley wines range from tawny copper to dark brown in colour and have a full body and high residual malty sweetness. Complexity of alcohols and fruity-ester characters are often high and counterbalanced by the perception of low to medium bitterness and extraordinary alcohol content. Hop aroma and flavour may be minimal to medium. English type hops are often used but not necessary for this style. Low levels of diacetyl may be acceptable. Caramel and some characters indicating oxidation, such as vinous (sometimes sherry-like) aromas and/or flavours, may be considered positive. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 21.5 – 28 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 6 – 8 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 8.4 – 12.0%
Bitterness (IBU): 40 – 60
Colour SRM: 14 – 22

B. Subcategory: American-Style Barley Wine Ale

American style barley wines range from amber to deep copper-garnet in colour and have a full body and high residual malty sweetness. Complexity of alcohols and fruity-ester characters are often high and counterbalanced by assertive bitterness and extraordinary alcohol content. Hop aroma and flavour are at medium to very high levels. American type hops are often used but not necessary for this style. Very low levels of diacetyl may be acceptable. A caramel and/or toffee aroma and flavour are often part of the character. Characters indicating oxidation, such as vinous (sometimes sherry-like) aromas and/or flavours, are not generally acceptable in American-style Barley Wine Ale, however if a low level of age-induced oxidation character harmonizes and enhances the overall experience this can be regarded flavourably. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 21.5 – 28.0 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 6.0 – 8.0 °Plato
Alcohol by Volume: 8.4 – 12.0%
Bitterness (IBU): 60 – 100
Colour SRM: 11 – 22

52. Wood and Barrel-Aged Beer

A. Subcategory: Wood and Barrel-Aged Pale to Amber Beer

A wood or barrel-aged pale to amber beer is any lager, ale or hybrid beer, either a traditional style or a unique experimental beer that has been aged for a period of time in a wooden barrel or in contact with wood, that meets the criteria for colour shown below. For purposes of this competition entries in this subcategory should have colour less than 18 SRM or 36 EBC but contain alcohol less than 5% a.b.w. or 6.25% a.b.v. Entries are aged with the intention of imparting the particularly unique character of the wood and/or what has previously been in the barrel. New wood character can be characterized as a complex blend of vanillin and unique wood character but wood aged is not necessarily synonymous with imparting wood flavours. Used sherry, bourbon, scotch, port, wine and other barrels are often used, imparting complexity and uniqueness to beer. Ultimately a balance of flavour, aroma and mouthfeel are sought with the marriage of new beer with wood and/or barrel flavours. Primary character of the beer style may or may not be apparent. Fruited or spiced wood and barrel-aged entries that meet colour and alcohol content criteria would be appropriately entered in this subcategory. Sour wood-aged beer, darker wood-aged beer (>18 SRM or >36 EBC) or higher alcohol wood-aged beer (>5%abw or >6.25%abv) of any colour should be entered in one of the appropriate categories or subcategories shown elsewhere.

*To allow for accurate judging the brewer must provide additional information about entries in this subcategory. Comments could include classic beer style being aged in wood, type of wood used (new or old, oak or other wood type), previous liquids in the barrel if any (port / whiskey / wine / sherry / other), base beer style or achieved character. Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during judging.

Original Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Alcohol by Volume: 3.75 – 6.5%
Bitterness (IBU): Varies with style
Colour SRM: 4 – 18

B. Subcategory: Wood and Barrel-Aged Dark Beer

A wood or barrel-aged dark beer is any lager, ale or hybrid beer, either a traditional style or a unique experimental beer that has been aged for a period of time in a wooden barrel or in contact with wood, that meets the criteria for colour shown below. For purposes of this competition entries in this subcategory should have colour greater than 18 SRM or 36 EBC, but contain alcohol less than 5% a.b.w. or 6.25% a.b.v. Entries are aged with the intention of imparting the particularly unique character of the wood and/or what has previously been in the barrel. New wood character is often characterized as a complex blend of vanillin and unique wood character but wood aged is not necessarily synonymous with imparting wood flavours. Used sherry, bourbon, scotch, port, wine and other barrels are often used, imparting complexity and uniqueness to beer. Ultimately a balance of flavour, aroma and mouthfeel are sought with the marriage of new beer with wood and/or barrel flavours. Primary character of the beer style may or may not be apparent. Examples of wood-aged darker classic styles include but are not limited to Irish-style dry stout, robust porter, brown ale or other dark beer styles. Fruited or spiced wood and barrel-aged entries that meet colour and alcohol criteria would be appropriately entered in this category. Sour wood aged dark beers, and wood-aged versions of higher alcohol beer styles with >5.2% abw or 6.5% abv (such as imperial stout, old ale or experimental styles for example) should be entered in other categories or subcategories.

*To allow for accurate judging the brewer must provide additional information about entries in this subcategory. Comments could include classic dark beer style being aged in wood, type of wood used (new or old, oak or other wood type), previous liquids in the barrel if any (port / whiskey / wine / sherry / other), base beer style or achieved character. Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during judging.

Original Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Alcohol by Volume: 3.75 – 6.5%
Bitterness (IBU): Varies with style
Colour SRM: > 18

53. Wood and Barrel-Aged Strong Beer

A wood or barrel-aged strong beer is any lager, ale or hybrid beer, either a traditional style or a unique experimental beer, that has been aged for a period of time in a wooden barrel or in contact with wood, that meets the criteria for alcoholic strength shown below. For purposes of this competition entries in this category should contain greater than 5.2% a.b.w. or 6.5% a.b.v. They may have any range of colour or other characteristics. Entries are aged with the intention of imparting the particularly unique character of the wood and/or what has previously been in the barrel. New wood character is often characterized as a complex blend of vanillin and unique wood character but wood aged is not necessarily synonymous with imparting wood flavours. Used sherry, bourbon, scotch, port, wine and other barrels are often used, imparting complexity and uniqueness to beer. Ultimately a balance of flavour, aroma and mouthfeel are sought with the marriage of new beer with wood and/or barrel flavours. Primary character of the beer style may or may not be apparent. Examples of wood-aged strong beer styles include but are not limited to imperial stout, double porter, triple pale ale or any other strong beer style that meets the criteria for alcohol content. Sour higher alcohol wood-aged beer (>5.2% abw or 6.5% abv) of any colour should be entered in another category.

*To allow for accurate judging the brewer must provide additional information about entries in this category. Comments could include classic strong beer style being aged in wood, type of wood used (new or old, oak or other wood type), previous liquids in the barrel if any (port / whiskey / wine / sherry / other), base beer style or achieved character. Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during judging.

Original Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Alcohol by Volume: > 5.2%
Bitterness (IBU): Varies with style
Colour SRM: Varies with style

54. Wood and Barrel-Aged Sour Beer

A wood or barrel-aged sour beer is any lager, ale or hybrid beer, either a traditional style or a unique experimental beer that has been aged for a period of time in a wooden barrel or in contact with wood and has developed a natural acidity induced by bacteria or other microbes. Entries are aged with the intention of imparting the particularly unique character of introduced micro ora or the micro ora present in the wood. Sometimes wood aging is intended to impart the particularly unique character of the wood and/or what has previously been in the barrel, but wood-aged is not necessarily synonymous with imparting wood flavours. Wood character can be characterized as a complex blend of vanillin and unique wood character.Usually bacterial and/or “wild” yeast fermentation contributes complex esters and results in a dry to very dry beer. Ultimately a balance of flavour , aroma and mouthfeel are sought with the marriage of acidity, complex esters and new beer with wood and/or barrel flavours.

*To allow for accurate judging the brewer must provide additional information about entries in this category. Comments could include classic or base beer style being aged in wood, type of wood used (new or old, oak or other wood type), type(s) of microbial contribution, previous liquids in the barrel if any (port/whiskey/wine/sherry/other) and achieved character. Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during judging.

Original Gravity” (°Plato): Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Alcohol by Volume: Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU): Varies with style
Colour SRM: Varies with style

55. Flavoured Stout/Porter

Flavoured stouts/porters should exhibit the characteristics of a standard example of the style, including a deep ruby to black colour, with a creamy foam head, dark and roasted malt flavours such as coffee, chocolate, burnt sugar, licorice, and some smoke. Bitterness should be balanced, without an accentuated hop aroma. Flavour and aroma should include additional flavouring ingredients. Additional ingredients should be very noticeable, while still in balance with the base flavours of the style.

*To allow for accurate judging the brewer must provide additional information about entries in this subcategory. Comments should include classic beer style as well as the additional flavouring agents used.

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